Linux Luddites

not all change is progress


January 30, 2014

Episode #3


Direct download links: MP3 & Ogg

Source Mage – moving our host – distraction-free word processing tools

News

Linux Voice’s Indiegogo had raised over £45k of the £90k goal as of our recording, with 31 days of their campaign still to go.

SLES now matching RHEL with 10 year standard support. In other SUSE news, openSUSE 13.1 released to positive reviews.

Canonical’s Jono Bacon claims Ubuntu has 25 million users at ~12:55 in this video.

Sony’s PS4 runs on modified FreeBSD.

Canonical developers criticised Linux Mint over their update policy. Do they have a point? Yes and no; regressions are bad. But was the criticism partly due to Mint’s popularity…? Clem from Linux Mint responded.

2 million Raspberry Pi’s now in sweaty palms (the ZX81 and BBC Micro each sold ~1.5M). Paddy was amused to find that his desktop PC is only about 4x/5x faster than a Pi.

OpenMandriva Lx, the first release of a Mandrake/ROSA based community distro, has hit the streets.

Viber (a popular cross-platform proprietary VoIP system) has released a Linux client.

Jolla (founded by ex-Nokia MeeGo/Mer folks) will be launching their new Sailfish powered smartphone on 27 November.

Pogoplug launch Safeplug, a $49 Tor-in-a-box doodad.

Joe called it: Mir won’t replace X in Ubuntu 14.04. Stability concerns may also mean that 14.04 ends up with a ‘franken kernel’.

Feedback

We received kind words from Jim Delahunty in an email, and from Ray on Twitter. Richard Ullger (@rullger on Twitter) pointed out a problem with our RSS feed, now rectified – thanks, Richard!

Rob Mackenzie asked us for Android tablet recommendations, and also let us know he had been inspired by the show to give Semplice a whirl.

Warren thanked us for recommending PageKite, which he is now trying out, and Jack got back in touch to follow up on his mail that we discussed on the last show.

Profus2 on IRC suggested we take a look at Bitlove for distributing the shows. Both Charlie Ogier and Ray Woods wrote us lovely emails telling us about their history of Linux use.

Thanks to you all – as you’re probably bored of hearing from us by now, not only does your feedback mean a lot to us, but it is helping to shape the future content of the show. Keep it coming!

On Debian & Schoolboy Errors

Paddy talked about his move from Xubuntu to vanilla Debian, including an initial (wetware) problem. He mentioned his favourite icon set and a way to clean up Debian fonts.

First Impressions

Joe talked briefly about Source Mage, and will be taking a quick look at Swift Linux for the next show.

From London to Amsterdam

Paddy talked about how we moved our website and mail services from a UK-based hosting company to a VPS system provided by DigitalOcean. He talked about the key importance of security, the software stack he’d built, and how he had used StartSSL.com to provide a needed SSL certificate and chain, and UptimeRobot for server monitoring.

As we said in the show, we’d be really interested to know if listeners would find value in us posting some tutorial blog posts – covering everything from beginner friendly guides through how to do the sort of server configuration discussed in the show. Do please let us know!

Over a Pint

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, what free software project would you give up your foggy and rainy homeland, travel thousands of miles across a perilous ocean and drive an entire culture almost to extinction to celebrate?

Both Paddy and Joe agreed that Debian would be on their personal list; Joe also suggested the VLC media player, whilst Paddy is looking forward to the promise offered by some of the mesh/edge networking projects being undertaken in the mobile space.

Off the Beaten Path

A slightly longer section this week, with Paddy looking at four distraction-free word processing tools: PyRoom, WordGrinder, FocusWriter and UberWriter (a positive frenzy of medial capitals!)

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